My Maternal 29th. Great Grandfather, Vicomte Hamon de Dinan, Bretagne, France

Dinan et la rivière la Rance, vallée de la Rance, Côtes d'Armor, France

Dinan et la rivière la Rance, vallée de la Rance, Côtes d’Armor, France

Name: Vicomte Hamon “Aimon” de Dinan 

Birth: 1 January 973
Dinan, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Death: 15 November 1031 (49-65)
Dinan, Cotes d’Armor, Bretagne, France

Dinan is a town in Brittany, northwest France. It’s known for its medieval ramparts, cobblestone streets and half-timbered houses. Dinan Castle has a 14th-century keep and the Tour du Coëtquen, a 15th-century artillery tower. The grand, Gothic-style Saint-Malo Church has vibrant stained-glass windows. The Clock Tower offers panoramic views. The Rail Museum has model railways, plus posters and signal boxes.

Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haimon de LEON
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamor de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haimon Le Vicomte De Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haimon Ou Aymon De Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamon de Dinan I
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haimon De Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamon de Dinan Viceroy
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamon de Dinan Vicompte de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamon De Dinan Viscount
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Vicomte Hamon Of Dinham
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamon Vicomte de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Vicomte de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haman or Hamor de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Hamor de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Haman II de Dinan
Alternate Name
Birth Name
Vicomte Hamon de Dinan
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Aymon de THOUARS
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Haimon de Domnonee Comte de Domnonee
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Aimon de Dinan I
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Seigneur De Chateau Du Lorie Aimon
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Vicomte de Dinan Hamon de Dinan
Alternate Name
Also Known As
Haimon
Custom Event
Title
Viscount of Dinan
Custom Event
Occupation
Seigneur

Immediate Family:

Husband of Hildeburge de Bellême

Married: about 995 in France
Father of Robert Fitz Hamon; Flaald, seneschal of Dol; Geoffroi I, vicomte de Dinan; Hamon de Dinan; Seigneur Joscelin de Dinan, of Dinan and 8 others
Added by: Laurie Bosley on August 7, 2007
Managed by: Loïc GEFFRIER and 53 others
Curated by: Pam Wilson  Source: geni.com

Sources
Vicomtes de Dinan at Medeival Lands.
His parents are unknown but he seems to have been a cadet of the Dukes of Brittany.

Some sources, with doubtful reliability, make him a son of Fratmaldus “the Seneschal”.

Other sources have different guesses about his possible father.

This is a Pedigree for the Archbishops of Dol in Brittany France
‘The earliest known person the lineage traces back to be a man named Hamo I, Viscount of Alet, France’ who was born between 963-1023 AD.

Photo of Dinan in Cotes-d'Armor, France

Photo of Dinan in Cotes-d’Armor, France

My Maternal 28th. Great Grandfather, Flaad seneschal, Hereditary Steward of Dol

dol-de-bretagne france

Name: Flaald, seneschal de Dol, Hereditary Steward of Dol

Birth: circa 1005
Dol, Ille-et Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Death: circa 1064 (51-67)
Saint-Malo-en-Donziois, Nievre, Burgandy, France

Immediate Family:
Son of Aimon I, viscount of Dinan and Hildeburge de Bellême
Husband of NN possible daughter of Crinan & Bethoc of Atholl, Princess of Scotland and Constance, de Dol

Married: about 1020 in to Constance, de Dol

Father of Alain “Dapifer” fitz Flaald, Seneschal of Dol
Brother of Robert Fitz Hamon; Geoffroi I, vicomte de Dinan; Hamon de Dinan; Seigneur Joscelin de Dinan, of Dinan; Ruellan I, seigneur de Dol and 7 others

Half brother of Aubert II Le Riche; Robert Brochard de Château-du-Loire, I; Gervais de Bellême, archevèque de Reims; Avesgaud de Château-du-Loire; Guillaume de Château-du-Loire and 1 other
Added by: Gretchen Renee Johnson on December 30, 2011
Managed by: Jessica Morgan and 30 others
Curated by: Pam Wilson, Curator

Source: geni.com

themorvanriver2cburgundy2cfrance

My Maternal 27th. Great Grandfather, Alain “Dapifer” fitz Flaad, Seneschal of Dol, en Bretagne, France

old house, dol de bretagne, france

Name: Alain “Dapifer” fitz Flaald Seneschal of Dol

Birth: 1020
Dol De Bretagne, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Married: about 1050 to Margaret of Atholl, Scotland “St. Margaret”

Married Name: Fitz Flaad

Children: (4)

Flaald Fitz Flaald Seneschal de Dol en Bretagne
1050–1080 • 9HQ6-6GH​​

Rhiwallon Fitz Alan Abbott of St. Floren
1052–Deceased • LB2Q-RH1​​

Alain (Alan) Seneschal & Dapifer
1056–1097 • LB2Q-RHB​​

Rivallon (Rhiwallon) Monk of Mezouit
1058–1082 • L8BQ-6CR​​

Death: 1080
Jerusalem, Palestine, Holy Land

Alternate Name:
Also Known As
Dapifer
Also Known As
Alan Dapifer of Dol FITZ FLAALD

Dol-de-Bretagne (BretonDolGalloDóu), cited in most historical records under its Breton name of Dol, is a commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine département in Brittany in northwestern France.

Dol-de-Bretagne is reputed to be the origin of the royal House of Stewart who became the monarchs of Scotland and later England and Ireland; a plaque in Dol commemorates that origin. The Stewart monarchs descend from Alan the Seneschal of the Bishop of Dol. His son, Flaad Fitzalan and his son Alan, arrived in Britain at the request of Henry I, King of England. Flaad’s grandson, Walter Fitzalan, was appointed the 1st Steward of Scotland by David I of ScotlandMalcolm IV of Scotland later confirmed the honour bestowed by David and made the office of Steward of Scotland hereditary in Walter’s family. In the fourteenth century, Walter Stewart (so named for his family’s hereditary possession of the office of High Steward of Scotland), a descendant of Walter Fitzalan, married Marjorie Bruce, daughter of King Robert I of Scotland. Their son became King Robert II, and their descendants the royal House of Stewart.

source: Wikipedia

Alt. Birth
Abt 1025
Dol-de-Bretagne, St. Malo, Bretagne, France

Alt. Death
Aft 1080
Dol, St. Malo, Bretagne, France

Alt. Death
1080
Jerusalem, Palestine, The Holy Land

Title
Seneschal of Dol

dol-de-bretagne france

Alain “Dapifer (c.1024-after 1080), Seneschal of Dol. He is now known to have scion of the seneschals of Brittany, but he was traditionally thought to have been a son of Fleance MacAlpin, Thane of Lochaber.

In MacBeth, Shakespeare has the witches tell Banquo that he will be the father of kings. The play was written for James I (VI) of England and Scotland, who as a descendant of Alan Dapifer was thought to have been a descendant of Banquo.  Source: https://www.geni.com/people/Alain-fitz-Flaald-Seneschal-of-Dol/6000000008927688420?through=6000000002176608911

Flaald, Herediary Steward of Dol “Flaald or Fleald; living 1080; active on the Welsh border c.1101. [Burke’s Peerage]

FLAALD Dapifer, the second son of ALAN “Dapifer”, occurs as “Float filius Alani dapiferi” at the dedication of Monmouth Priory 1101. He is also mentioned as brother of Alan, the other “Dapifer.”

Children: 1.Alan Fitz Flaald , feudal Baron of Oswestry, Shropshire, England.

 

My Maternal 21st. Great Grandfather, Sir Alexander Stewart, 4th. High Steward of Scotland

dundonald_castle_dundonald_argyllshire_scotlandDundonald Castle, Scotland... Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland was born and died there

Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland

Name: Alexander Stewart (d. 1283), also known as Alexander of Dundonald, 4th. hereditary High Steward of Scotland from his father’s death in 1246.

Born: January 1214

Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland

Married: Jean MacRory, Countess of Bute on about 1230 Scotland

Death: Feb. 1283
Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland
Burial: 1283
Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland

A son of Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland by his wife Bethóc, daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus, Alexander is said to have accompanied Louis IX of France on the Seventh Crusade (1248–1254).

In 1255 he was one of the councillors of King Alexander III, though under age. He was the principal commander under King Alexander III of Scotland at the Battle of Largs, on 2 October 1263, when the Scots defeated the Norwegians under Haakon IV. The Scots invaded and conquered the Isle of Man the following year, which was, with the whole of the Western Isles, then annexed to the Crown of Scotland.

Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland married Jean Macrory, heiress of the Isles of Bute and Arran, daughter of James (who with his father and brothers were killed in 1210 by the men of Skye), son of Angus, Lord of Bute & Arran (younger son of Somerled, King of the South Isles).

They had the following children:
James Stewart, 5th High Steward of Scotland (c. 1260-1309)
Sir John Stewart of Bonkill, Berwickshire (d. 22 July 1298), described as the “second son” who married the Bonkill heiress, had seven sons and one daughter, and was killed in the Battle of Falkirk. Agnatic ancestor of British kings.

Andrew Stewart (a.k.a. Andrew Steward) Esq.,third son of Alexander Stewart. Married the daughter of James Bethe. Father of Sir Alexander ‘the fierce’ Steward and direct ancestor of Oliver Cromwell.
Great uncle of King Robert II.
Elizabeth Stewart, (d. before 1288) Married Sir William Douglas the Hardy, Governor of Berwick-upon-Tweed. She was the mother of the Good Sir James Douglas.

Hawise Stewart, married John de Soulis, brother of the Lord of Liddesdale.
Through his eldest son James, Alexander was a great-grandparent of King Robert II, the first Stewart to be King of Scots, and thus ancestors of all subsequent Scottish monarchs and the later and current monarchs of Great Britain.

Through his second son John, Alexander was a patrilineal ancestor of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, and of the Stuart monarchs of Scotland and England from Darnley’s son James VI and I onwards.  source: Wikipedia

My Maternal 26th. Great Grandfather, Flaald fitz Flaald, Seneschal de Dol en Bretagne, France

dol-de-bretagne france

Dol-de-Bretagne France

Name: Flaald fitz Flaald, Seneschal de Dol en Bretagne
Gender: Male

Birth: circa 1050
Dol-de-Bretagne, Bretagne, France

Death: about 1080
Monmouth, Monmouthshire, Wales

Place of Burial: about Dol, Bretagne, France

Immediate Family:
Son of Alain “Dapifer” fitz Flaald, Seneschal of Dol and N.N. (unknown)

Husband of Daughter Of Ava MacAlpin, (domina Norton)

Married: 1075 in Dol-de-Bretagne, Bretagne, France

Father of Alan FitzFlaald, Sheriff of Shropshire and Sibil fitz Flaald, of Dol
Added by: Conrad Kamaha’o Herrmann on May 23, 2007
Managed by: James Fred Patin, Jr. and 151 others
Curated by: Jason Scott Wills
source: geni.com

old house, dol de bretagne, france

Old House in Dol-de-Bretagne France

 

My Maternal 25th. Great Grandfather, Alan Fitz Flaad, Baron of Oswestry

la grande rue (main street), dol-de-bretagne, ille-et-vilaine, bretagne, france.

La Grande Rue (main street), Dol-de-Bretagne, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Dol-de-Bretagne is reputed to be the origin of the royal House of Stewart who became the monarchs of Scotland and later England and Ireland; a plaque in Dol commemorates that origin. The Stewart monarchs descend from Alan the Seneschal of the Bishop of Dol. His son, Flaad Fitzalan and his son Alan, arrived in Britain at the request of Henry I, King of England. Flaad’s grandson, Walter Fitzalan, was appointed the 1st Steward of Scotland by David I of ScotlandMalcolm IV of Scotland later confirmed the honour bestowed by David and made the office of Steward of Scotland hereditary in Walter’s family. In the fourteenth century, Walter Stewart (so named for his family’s hereditary possession of the office of High Steward of Scotland), a descendant of Walter Fitzalan, married Marjorie Bruce, daughter of King Robert I of Scotland. Their son became King Robert II, and their descendants the royal House of Stewart. source: Wikipedia

oswestry, shropshire, england

Oswestry, Shropshire, England

Name: Alan Fitz Flaad, Breton Knight, Baron of Oswestry

Born: 1078 in Dol, St. Malo, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Married: Avelina de Hesdin domina Norton in about 1094 in England

Children: (7) Adeline, Flaad, William, Walter, Jordan, Simon, and Sibil 

Died: 11 November 1114 in Dol, St. Malo, Ille-et-Vilaine, Bretagne, France

Buried: 1114  in Shropshire, England

 Sheriff of Shropshire

*****************************************************
Received the Barony of Swaldestre from William the Conqueror for participation in the Conquest.

Acceded: about 1070, Oswestry, Shropshire, England

Notes: having participated in the Conquest, obtained by the gift of King William the Conqueror, the barony and castle of Oswaldestre, Salop, and Milcham, Norfolk, some of which belonged to Meredith, Prince of Powys ap Bleddyn, King of Powys. He received the shreivalty of Shropshire from King Henry I. While his parentage is more or less obscure, there is evidence to show that Flaald, his father, lived in Brittany and was a brother of Alain, seneschal of Dol, descended from the old Armonican counts of Dol and Dinan.

Alain Fitz Flaald was also the father or grandfather of William Fitzalan, steward to David I, King of Scotland, ancestor of the Stuarts, kings of that country.

Alain Fitz Flaald was also the father of William Fitzalan, to whom Henry II gave in second marriage Isabel De Say, baroness of Clun, the greatest heiress of Shropshire.

He was ancestor of John Fitzalan, who married Isabel, sister and co-heiress of Hugh d’Albigny. Upon a division of Hugh’s property at his death in 1243, the castle of Arundel was assigned to John, son of the aforementioned John and Isabel, who thus became the first Earl of eventually passed to Mary, daughter and heiress of Henry Fitzalan, who carried it, together Arundel of the Fitzalan line. This property with the earldom and the barony of Maltravers, to her husband Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, in which family it still remains. Alain Fitz Flaald and his wife Adeline were benefactors to priory of Castle Acre, early in the reign of Henry I.

source: The Complete Peerage vol.V, pp.391-392. 

aerial photograph of Oswestry Castle, Shropshire UK.
aerial photograph of Oswestry Castle, Shropshire UK. First recorded in the Doomsday book of 1086, Oswestry Castle lies near the English – Welsh border and was much fought over , changing hands numerous times during the medieval period. Richard II held parliament here in 1398 and during the English Civil war it was initially held by the Royalists before being captured by the parliamentarians in 1644. Following the war the castle was slighted and has remained in ruins ever since.

My Maternal 24th. Great Grandfather, Walter Fitz Alan, 1st. High Steward of Scotland

oswestry, shropshire, england

Oswestry, Shropshire, England

Name: Walter FitzAlan, 1st. High Steward of Scotland

Walter’s name and title as it appears in a royal charter to Holyrood Abbey: “Walter filio alani Dapifero”.

Successor: Alan FitzWalter, 2nd. High Steward of Scotland

oswestry_castle_shropshire_england.jpg

Oswestry Castle, Oswestry, Shropshire, England

Born: 1106 in Oswestry Castle, Oswestry, Shropshire, England

Died: 1177 in Melrose Abbey
Buried: 1177 in Paisley Priory, 
Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Noble family FitzAlan family

Spouse(s) Eschina de Molle DeLondoniis

Married: 1126 in Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, England

Children: David FitzAlan, Margaret FitzWalter, Emma FitzAlan, Simon FitzAlan, William FitzAlan, Alan FitzWalter, 2nd. High Steward of Scotland

Father: Alan FitzFlaald
Mother: Avelina de Hesdin

Walter FitzAlan (born c.1110; died 1177) was a twelfth-century Scottish magnate and Steward of Scotland. He was a younger son of Alan Fitz Flaad and Avelina de Hesdin.

In about 1136, Walter entered into the service of David I, King of Scotland. He became the king’s dapifer or steward in about 1150, and served as such for three successive Scottish kings: David, Malcolm IV, and William I. In time, the stewardship became hereditarily-held by Walter’s descendants.

Walter started his career as a minor English baron. Upon arriving in Scotland, however, he received a substantial grant of lands from his Scottish sovereigns. These included the western provincial lordships of: Mearns, Strathgryfe, Renfrew and North Kyle. The caput of Walter’s holdings is uncertain, although there is reason to suspect it was either Dundonald Castle or Renfrew Castle. Walter was a benefactor of several religious houses, and was the founder of Paisley Priory.

There is reason to suspect that Walter took part in the Siege of Lisbon against the Moors in 1147. He probably assisted Malcolm in the series of Scottish invasions of Galloway in the 1160, which resulted in the downfall of Fergus, Lord of Galloway.

In fact, Walter and the other colonial lords settled in western Scotland were probably intended to protect the Scottish realm from external threats located in regions such as Galloway and the Isles. In 1164, Somairle mac Gilla Brigte, King of the Isles invaded Scotland and was defeated near Renfrew. It is possible that the commander of the local Scottish forces was Walter himself.

Walter was married to Eschina de Londres, an apparent member of the Londres/London family. There is reason to suspect that she was also matrilineally descended from a family native to southern Scotland. If correct, this could explain why Walter was granted the lands of Mow. Alternately, it is possible that Eschina’s rights to Mow merely stemmed from her marriage to Walter. Eschina and Walter were the parents of Alan, Walter’s successor. The couple may have also been the parents of a Christina, a woman who married into the Brus and Dunbar families. Walter was an ancestor of the Stewart family, from which descended the royal Stewart/Stuart dynasty. He died in 1177.

Contents
1 Ancestry and arrival in Scotland
2 Ecclesiastical actions
3 Eschina de Londres
4 Galloway
5 The Isles
6 Death and successors
7 Notes
8 Citations
9.1 Primary sources
9.2 Secondary sources
10 External links
Ancestry and arrival in Scotland
Map of Western Europe
Locations relating to the life and times of Walter.
Walter was a member of the FitzAlan family. He was born in about 1110. Walter was a son of Alan FitzFlaald (died 1121×) and Avelina de Hesdin. Alan and Avelina had three sons: Jordan (fl. 1128–1130), William (died 1160), and Walter.

Walter’s father was a Breton knight who was granted lands in Shropshire by Henry I, King of England (died 1135). Previous to this, Alan had acted as steward to the bishops of Dol in Brittany. Walter was a minor English landholder. He held North Stoke, north of Arundel, by way of a grant from his brother, William. There is reason to suspect that Walter also held Manhood, south of Chichester. He also held land at “Conelon” or “Couten”, a place that possibly refers to Cound in Shropshire.

Walter appears to have arrived in Scotland in about 1136, during the reign of David I, King of Scotland (died 1153). Following Henry’s death in 1135, the Fitz Alans evidently sided with David in his support of the contested English royal claims of Henry’s daughter, Matilda (died 1167). Certainly, both William and Walter witnessed acts of Matilda in 1141. In any event, the date of Walter’s introduction into Scotland may be marked by the original part of the so-called “foundation charter” of Melrose Abbey, which records Walter as a witness.

David I, King of Scotland as he is depicted in a mid twelfth-century royal charter.
Walter served as David’s dapifer or senescallus (steward). He served in this capacity for three successive Scottish kings: David, Malcolm IV (died 1165), and William I (died 1214). Walter is increasingly attested by royal charters from about 1150, and it is possible that it was at about this time that David granted him the stewardship to be held heritably.

As the king’s steward, Walter would have been responsible for the day-to-day running of the king’s household. Whilst the chamberlain was responsible for the king’s sleeping compartments, the steward oversaw the king’s hall. It is possible that David sought to replace the Gaelic office of rannaire (“food-divider”) with that of the steward. This office certainly appears to have been a precursor to the stewardship. Walter’s ancestors were stewards to the Breton lords of Dol.

In fact, his elder brother, Jordan, inherited this stewardship from their father, and held this office at the time of Walter’s own establishment in Scotland. As such, it is probable that Walter possessed a degree of experience in the profession.

map of great britain

Map of Great Britain

Twelfth-century secular lordships on the western seaboard of Scotland. Walter’s domain included the depicted regions of Strathgryfe, Renfrew, Mearns, and North Kyle. Clydesdale and South Kyle were royal lordships, whilst Cunningham was a Morville lordship.
Walter lived during a period in history when Scottish monarchs sought to attract men to their kingdom by promising them gifts of land. To such kings, royal authority depended upon their ability to give away territories in the peripheries of the realm.

Although the twelfth-century Scottish monarchs did not create any new earldoms for the incoming Anglo-Norman magnates, they did grant them provincial lordships. The most important of these mid-century colonial establishments were: Annandale for Robert de Brus (died 1142); Upper Eskdale and Ewesdale for Robert Avenel (died 1185); Lauderdale and Cunningham for Hugh de Morville (died 1162); Liddesdale for Ranulf de Sules (died 1165×1172); and Mearns, Strathgryfe, Renfrew and North Kyle for Walter himself.

As a result of their tenure in high office, and their dominating regional influence, these provincial lords were equal to the native Scottish earls in all but rank.

Walter’s charter of Birkenside, Legerwood and Mow from Malcolm IV, King of Scotland.
In 1161×1162, Malcolm confirmed Walter’s stewardship, and confirmed David’s grants of Renfrew, Paisley, Pollock, “Talahret”, Cathcart, Dripps, Mearns, Eaglesham, Lochwinnoch and Innerwick. He also granted Walter West Partick, Inchinnan, Stenton, Hassenden, Legerwood and Birkenside, as well as a toft with twenty acres in every burgh and demesne in the realm. For this grant, Walter owed his sovereign the service of five knights. The grant of lodgings in every important royal settlement would have only been entrusted to people particularly close to the king, and to those who were expected to travel with him. The impressive list of twenty-nine eminent men who attested this transaction appears to be evidence that the proceedings took place in a public setting before the royal court.

At some point during his career, Walter received North Kyle from either David or Malcolm. Also in 1161×1162—perhaps on the same date as Malcolm’s aforesaid charter to Walter—the king granted Walter the lands of Mow for the service of one knight. There is reason to suspect that David’s original grant of lands to Walter took place in 1136. Certainly in 1139×1146, Walter witnessed a charter of David to the cathedral of Glasgow in which the king invested the cathedral with assets from Carrick, Cunningham, Strathgryfe and Kyle. In 1165, Walter is stated to have held lands worth two knight’s fees in Shropshire. As such, the vast majority of his holdings were located north of the Anglo-Scottish border.

Ecclesiastical actions

Ruinous Wenlock Priory. Walter appears to have been a devotee of this English Cluniac priory.
Walter was a benefactor of Melrose Abbey, and granted this religious house the lands of Mauchline in Ayrshire. He also granted his lands in Dunfermline to Dunfermline Abbey.

Walter founded Paisley Priory in about 1163. This religious house was initially established at Renfrew—at King’s Inch near Renfrew Castle—before removing to Paisley within a few years. The fact that Walter made this a Cluniac monastery could be evidence that he was personally devoted to the Cluniac Wenlock Priory in Shropshire. Alternately, the decision to associate Wenlock with his foundation at Renfrew could have stemmed from a devotion to the cult of Wenlock’s patron saint: St Milburga.

There is reason to suspect that Walter was amongst the Scots who took part in the campaign to liberate Lisbon from the Moors.
Walter’s priory at Paisley was dedicated in part to St James the Great. This, coupled with the fact that Walter did not witness any of David’s acts during a span of time in 1143×1145, could be evidence that Walter undertook a pilgrimage to the shrine of St James the Great at Santiago de Compostela. In the spring of 1147, Scots joined an Anglo-Flemish fleet in Dartmouth, and set off to join the Second Crusade.  source: Wikipedia

rothesay castle, rothesay, scotland

My Maternal 23th. Great Grandfather, Alan Fitz Walter Stewart, 2nd. High Steward of Scotland

renfrewshire, paisley, dunn square 1900's

Renfrewshire, Paisley, Dunn Square 1900’s

Name: Lord Alan FitzWalter, 2nd. High Steward of Scotland

Birth: 1140
Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Married: (3 times) Lady Margaret of Galloway, Alesta Nic Morggan of Mar before 1167 in Carrick, Ayrshire, Scotland, and Eva Crawford.

Dundonald Castle, Scotland... Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland was born and died there

Children: Alexander, Simon, Eva, Walter, Leonard, David, and Niel FitzAlan

Death: 24 August 1204
Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland

dundonald_castle_dundonald_argyllshire_scotland

Dundonald Castle, Ayrshire, Scotland

Burial:
1204
Paisley Abbey, Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

paisley-abbey-paisley-renfrewshire-scotland

Paisley-abbey-paisley-renfrewshire-scotland

Name: Alan FitzWalter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland 

“hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader. dapifer to William the Lion”, “King of Scots”, “2nd. High Steward of Scotland”, “0416”, “Alan “2nd High Steward of Scotland” FitzWalter”
Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland
(c.1150 – 1204)
Son of Walter FitzAlan, 1st High Steward of Scotland and Eschyna de Londoniis
Husband of Eva Crawford; Alesta nic Morggán, of Mar and Margaret of Galloway
Father of Alexander Stewart, I; Simon FitzWalter; Avelina FitzAlan, Countess of Carrick; Walter Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland and 4 others
Brother of David Fitz-Alan; Emma Fitz-Alan; Walter fitz Walter; Simon Fitzwalter source: geni.com

Alan FitzWalter was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader. Alan was the son and heir of Walter fitz Alan, by his spouse Eschina, who was possibly a member of a family from the south of Scotland. From the time of his succession to his death in 1204, Alan served as dapifer to William the Lion, King of Scots. It was during Alan’s lifetime that his family acquired the Isle of Bute. He was possibly responsible for the erection of Rothesay Castle on the island. source: Wikipedia

rothesay castle, rothesay, scotland

Rothesay Castle, Rothesay, Scotland

Alan fitz Walter was hereditary High Steward of Scotland and a crusader. Alan was the son and heir of Walter fitz Alan, by his spouse Eschina, who was possibly a member of a family from the south of Scotland. From the time of his succession to his death in 1204, Alan served as dapifer to William the Lion, King of Scots. It was during Alan’s lifetime that his family acquired the Isle of Bute. He was possibly responsible for the erection of Rothesay Castle on the island. source: Wikipedia

clans of scotland

 

My Maternal 24th. Great Grandfather, Walter Fitz Alan Stewart, 3rd. High Steward of Scotland

lake_of_menteith_looking_towards_port_of_monteith_scotland

Lake of Menteith, Scotland

Name:  Walter Fitz Alan Stewart, 3rd High Steward of Scotland

Birth:  1167
Dundonald, Ayrshire, Scotland

Married: 1210

Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland to Bethoc Nichol Gille Crist, Countess of Angus

Children: (10)

Alexander Stewart, 4th. High Steward of Scotland, sometime Regent of Scotland.
Sir Robert, of Tarbolten and Crookston, and Lord of Darnley.
John, killed at Damietta in 1249, Egypt during the Seventh Crusade.
Walter Bailloch (“the Freckled”), who married Mary de Menteith and became Earl of Menteith.
William,
Beatrix, married Maol Domhnaich, Earl of Lennox.
Christian,
Eupheme, married Adam Wallace, Laird of Riccarton.
Margaret, married her cousin Niall, Earl of Carrick.
Sybella, married Colin Fitzgerald, 1st Lord of Kintail.

Death :
1246
Dundonald Castle, Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland

Burial:
1246
Paisley Abbey, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Walter was the first in the line to assume the name of Stewart. He witnessed a charter by King Alexander II under the desination “Walterus filius Alani, Senuscallus, Justicar Scotiae”

http://theroyalhouseofstewart.com/descendants_of_the_royal_house_of_stewart_015.htm

Alan died in 1204 leaving a son called Walter who was appointed by King Alexander II of Scotland as justiciary of Scotland in addition to the hereditary office of high steward. This Walter died in 1246 leaving four sons and three daughters.

The third son called Walter was Earl of Menteith. The eldest son, called Alexander married Jean, the daughter and heiress of James Lord of Bute. In her right their son James Stewart seized both the Isle of Bute and Isle of Arran.

https://www.scotweb.co.uk/info/stewart/

Note the slight discrepancy in death date

Walter Stewart
Born unknown
Died 1246
Title 3rd High Steward of Scotland
Tenure 1204-1246
Other names Walter Steward of Dundonald
Nationality Scottish
Offices Justiciar of Scotia
Predecessor Alan fitz Walter
Successor Alexander Stewart
Spouse(s) Béthoc (Beatrix) Mac Gille Críst
Parents Alan fitz Walter
Walter Steward of Dundonald (died 1246) was 3rd hereditary High Steward of Scotland and Justiciar of Scotia.

He was the eldest son of Alan fitz Walter, 2nd High Steward of Scotland but which wife of Alan’s was his mother is not clear. He was the first to use Stewart as a surname, and was designated “of Dundonald”.

He witnessed a charter by King Alexander II, under the designation of “Walterus filius Alani, Senescallus, Justiciar Scotiae” and it may be that seal which Nisbet described pertaining to Walter Hereditary High Steward of Scotland. Around the seal it states “Sigill. Walteri filii Allani”.

Family
Walter married Bethóc, daughter of Gille Críst, Earl of Angus by his wife, Marjorie, youngest daughter of Henry of Scotland, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon and his wife, Ada de Warenne.

They were parents of:

Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland, sometime Regent of Scotland.
Sir Robert, of Tarbolten and Crookston, and Lord of Darnley.
John, killed at Damietta in 1249, Egypt during the Seventh Crusade.
Walter Bailloch (“the Freckled”), who married Mary de Menteith and became Earl of Menteith.
William,
Beatrix, married Maol Domhnaich, Earl of Lennox.
Christian,
Eupheme, married Adam Wallace, Laird of Riccarton.
Margaret, married her cousin Niall, Earl of Carrick.
Sybella, married Colin Fitzgerald, 1st Lord of Kintail.

References:
G. W. S. Barrow, ‘Stewart family (per. c.1110–c.1350)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004.
Anderson (1867) vol.ix, p.512
Simpson, David, The Genealogical and Chronological History of the Stuarts, 1713, p.38
Burke, Messrs., John and John Bernard, The Royal Families of England, Scotland, and Wales &c., volume 2, London, 1851, pps: xl and xli
Nisbet, Alexander, A System of Heraldry volume 1, Edinburgh 1722, facsimile 1984, part 1, p.43,
Clay, John W., FSA., editor, The Visitation of Cambridge, 1575 and 1619 by Henery St.George, Richmond Herald, Harleian Society, London, 1897, pps: 7 – 11 source: Wikipedia

clans of scotland

Clans of Scotland Map

My Maternal 20th. Great Grandfather, Sir John Stewart, Lord of Boynkill

 

 

bonkyl_kirk_berwickshire_scotland

Bonkyl_Kirk_Berwickshire_Scotland

Birth:  1246
Boynkill Castle
Berwickshire, Scotland
Death:  Jul. 22, 1298
Falkirk
Stirlingshire, Scotland
Name: Sir John Stewart, Lord of Bonkyl, son of Sir Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland and Jean (MacRory) Stewart.

Died: 22 July 1298 at the First Battle of Falkirk while commanding the Scottish Archers.

King of ScotsStewart Tartan

He is buried at the Falkirk Old Parish Church, Falkirk, Stirling, Scotland

Falkirk Old Parish Church, Falkirk, Scotland2

 Falkirk Old Parish Church, Falkirk, Stirling, Scotland
Burial:
Falkirk Old Parish Church
Falkirk
Stirling, Scotland
 Sir John Stewart, Lord of Boynkill-Marker ReadsJohn Stewart, 1245-1298, soldier

Inscription:
“Here Lies Scottish Hero Sir John Stewart
who was killed at the Battle of Falkirk on  22 July 1298”

Created by: Mike Burnett
Record added: Jan 27, 2014
Find A Grave Memorial# 124254040

Sir John Stewart of Bonkyll (died 22 July 1298) was a son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. He was a military commander during the First Scottish War of Independence and during the Battle of Falkirk, he commanded the Scottish archers, and was killed during the battle. Stewart is interred in the churchyard of the Falkirk Old Parish Church.

Marriage and children

Memorial Stone & Esplanade Gardens, Rothesay. “In honour of the ‘Men of Bute’ who, under the command of Sir John Stewart, fell to a man at the Battle of Falkirk, 22nd July 1298. Who fought for Wallace on Falkirk’s field, John Stewart’s men with sword and shield but o’er pow’rd thus! Their fate was sealed for freedom fell.”

John married Margaret de Bonkyl (Bonkill), the heiress daughter of Sir Alexander de Bonkyl of that Ilk, so placed “on a bend Sable three buckles Or” for difference upon the coat of arms of his paternal line, “Or a fess chequey Argent and Azure”.

They had issue:

Lady Margaret appears to have remarried, as she is named as wife to Sir David de Brechin in 1304.

Royal descendants

He is the direct paternal ancestor of Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, the second husband of his brother’s descendant, Mary, Queen of Scots. Thus, he is a direct agnatic ancestor of James VI of Scotland, who later became James I of England in 1603. This accession of James I united the thrones of England, Scotland, and Ireland.

Notes

Hardy, Rev J.,The session book of Bunkle and Preston, 1665-1690 p.xxiii

Murison, Alexander Falconer (1900). Sir William Wallace. New York: C. Scribner. p. 105. Retrieved 11 July 2018

Cal. Doc. Scot. vol ii, pp 410-411

Calendar of documents relating to Scotland preserved in Her Majesty’s Public Record Office. V vols., ed Bain. London 1881. 

http://www.thepeerage.com/p514.htm

Bonkyll_Castle_ruins

Bonkyll Castle, Berwickshire, Scotland

The caput of the wealthy honour of Bonkyll, the castle originally belonged to the eponymous Bonkyl family, passing by marriage in the late 13th century to Sir John Stewart, son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland. Sir John’s grandson, also Sir John Stewart married Margaret de Abernethy, the heiress of the Lordship of Abernethy in 1328 and the following year he was created Earl of Angus, thus combining broad territories in BerwickshireAngus, and Kinross-shire. Sir John’s granddaughter, Margaret Stewart, being his sole heiress inherited the Earldom of Angus and Lordship of Abernethy, and the honour of Bunkle. She had an illicit affair with William Douglas, 1st Earl of Douglas, of which liaison, a child was produced, George Douglas, 1st Earl of Angus. From the Countess Margaret’s death in 1417 Bunkle remained under the ownership of the Douglas Earls of Angus until the late 18th century when it passed to the Earls of Home.

 

My Maternal 18th. Great Grandfather, King Robert Stewart II, Scotland

Robert_II_of_ScotlandKing_Robert_II_of_ScotlandKing of Scots

My Maternal 18th. Great Grandfather, King Robert Stewart II, Scotland. Scottish monarch. Son of Walter, Steward of Scotland and Marjory Bruce, daughter of Robert the Bruce. He served as Regent for David II twice, while David was in exile in France and again while imprisoned in England.

Robert succeeded David in 1371, and was crowned at Scone on March 26.

His first marriage to Elizabeth Mure and the 9 children of the union were declared illegitimate, as the couple were too closely related. A Papal dispensation was acquired in 1347, but to many it still wasn’t enough.

Upon the death of his first wife he married Euphemia Ross, who would become his queen, in 1355. They had four children. The question of the legitimacy of his first marriage would later play a big part in the succession.

Robert is thought to have had 21 or more children in total, including at least 8 illegitimate children by various mistresses.

It was said about Robert that “A more tender heart no man could have”. Most of his 19-year reign was troubled by wars he could play little part in. He allowed his son Robert, Earl of Carrick (later Robert III), to act in his stead most of the time. Old and infirm, he died at Dundonald Castle at the age of 74. (bio by: Kristen Conrad) 

Dundonald Castle, Scotland... Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland was born and died theredundonald_castle_dundonald_argyllshire_scotland

Birth: Mar. 2, 1316
Paisley
Renfrewshire, Scotland

Family links:
Parents:
Walter Stewart (1292 – 1326)
Marjory Bruce Stewart (1296 – 1316)

Spouses:
Elizabeth Mure Stewart (1320 – 1354)
Euphemia Ross (1332 – 1387)

Children:
Alexander Stewart (____ – 1405)
Walter Stewart (____ – 1362)
Robert Stewart, King of Scots (1337 – 1406)
Robert Stewart (1340 – 1420)
Elizabeth Stewart Hay (1346 – 1389)
Marjorie Stewart Dunbar (1348 – 1417)
Jean Stewart Lyon (1350 – 1404)
David Stewart (1357 – 1389)

Death: Apr. 19, 1390
Dundonald
South Ayrshire, Scotland

Burial: April 19, 1390
Scone Abbey
Scone
Perth and Kinross, Scotland

Maintained by: Find A Grave
Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
Record added: Sep 13, 2004
Find A Grave Memorial# 9457579

Royal Family History

Contributed By: Kyle Baker · 14 July 2014 ·

Name: King Robert II of Scotland
Father: Walter Stewart
Mother: Marjorie daughter of Robert Bruce
Relation to Elizabeth II: 17th great-grandfather
House of: Stewart
Born: March 2, 1316 at Paisley
Ascended to the throne: February 22, 1371 aged 54 years
Crowned: March 26, 1371 at Scone Abbey, Perthshire
Married:(1) Elizabeth Mure, 1336
Married:(2) Euphemia of Moray, 1355
Children: 10 by Elizabeth Mure including John (Robert III), 4 by Euphemia and several illegitimate.
Died: April 19, 1390, at Dundonald Castle, Ayrshire, aged 74 years, 1 month, and 17 days
Buried at: Scone Abbey
Succeeded by: his son John who took the name Robert III

Robert was a grandson of Robert Bruce, and the first in the House of Stewart dynasty. The name came from his ancestor Walter Stewart who was appointed High Steward of Scotland by David I. He had escaped following the defeat of David II at Halidon Hill in 1333 and took over as Guardian of Scotland while David was in exile in France.

He was a mature man of 54 when he succeeded to the throne on the death of David, but he was weak king and did not rule well over the nobles who were critical of him leading to a loss of prestige of the crown. His heir John took over the rule to attempt to restore law and order.

A truce with England in 1384 was short lived, and the border wars continued. In 1388 the Scots under James Douglas won a victory at Otterburn near Newcastle over Henry Percy ‘Hotspur’ of Northumberland.

Robert had 14 legitimate children and at least 7 illegitimate. He was succeeded by his son John who took the name Robert III.

Timeline for King Robert II of Scotland
Historical Timeline for Scotland 834 – Present
1371
Robert Stewart, the first Stewart King of Scotland becomes king
1384
Truce is arranged between England, Scotland, and France. Scotland refuses to recognize truce. Anglo Scottish war resumes
1388
Battle of Otterburn in which Scots defeat Henry Percy (Harry Hotspur)
1390
Robert II dies and is succeeded by his son John, who becomes Robert III.

My Maternal 19th. Great Grandfather, Sir Alan Stewart, Knight

scotland

Name: Sir Alan Stewart, son of John Stewart of Bonkyll and his wife Margaret de Bonkyll

Born: 1292 in Dreghorn, Ayershire, Scotland

Dreghorn Castle, now ruined, was a 17th century mansion, and was constructed circa1658 by Sir William Murray

Dreghorn Castle, Dreghorn, Ayershire, Scotland

Dreghorn, Scotland

The son of Sir John Stewart of Bonkyll and his wife Lady Margaret de Bonkyll, Sir Alan fought for Robert the Bruce during the First War of Scottish Independence.

Sir Alan accompanied Edward Bruce to Ireland in 1315, during the latter’s attempt at the throne of Ireland. He was captured by the English in 1316 but was quickly ransomed. For his services to the King, Sir Alan was granted the lands of Dreghorn in Ayrshire.

Sir Alan Stewart was killed with his brothers, Sir James and Sir John Stewart, at the Battle of Halidon Hill in 1333.

With unknown mothers, Sir Alan Stewart had these children:

John Stewart of Cruikston and Darnley

Walter Stewart

Alexander Stewart of Darnley

Elizabeth Stewart – married John fitz Walter, son of Walter fitz Gilbert of Cadzow

Died: 19 July 1333 during the Battle of Halidon Hill. source: Wikipedia

Married: 1318 to Marion Cameron in Scotland

Died: 19 July 1333 in the Second War for Scottish Independence at the Battle of Halidon Hill, Northumberland, England

BATTLE OF HALIDON HILL, ENGLAND

The Battle of Halidon Hill (19 July 1333) was fought during the Second War of Scottish Independence. Scottish forces under Sir Archibald Douglas were heavily defeated by the English forces of King Edward III of England on unfavourable terrain while trying to relieve Berwick-upon-Tweed.

My Maternal 18th. Great Grandfather, Sir Alexander Stewart of Darnley

scotland

Name:
Sir Alexander Stewart of Darnley, Fifth Laird of Darnley, son of Sir Alan Stewart, Knight and Marion Cameron

Birth: 1325
Darnley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Waterfall, Dams to Darnley, Glasgow, Scotland

Married: 1360 in Lochjelly, Fifeshire, Scotland to Lady Johanna Turnbull

 

Lochjelly Cemetery, Lochjelly, Perthshire, Scotland

Lochjelly Cemetery, Fifeshire, Scotland

Death:
5 May 1404
Dundonald, Ayrshire, Scotland

Dundonald Castle, Scotland... Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland was born and died there

Dundonald Castle, Scotland… Robert II Stewart, King of Scotland was born and died there.

Darnley Jewel, 1571-78, Scotland

Darnley Jewel

Dunkeld_Cathedral_Scotland

Dunkeld Cathedral, Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland

Burial: after 5 May 1404
Dunkeld Cathedral, Dunkeld, Perthshire, Scotland

My Maternal 18th. Great Grandmother, Lady Janet Stewart of Darnley

Waterfall, Dams to Darnley, Glasgow, Scotland

Darnley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Name: Lady Janet Stewart of Darnley, daughter of Sir Alexander Stewart of Darnley and Lady Johanna Turnbull of Scotland.

Birth:  1370
Darnley, Renfrewshire, Scotland

Married: about 1385 in Lanarkshire, Scotland to Lord Thomas Somerville, I 

Children: Baron William Somerville, Margaret, Thomas, David, Mary, Giles, and Elizabeth Somerville. 

St. Mary's Aisle, Carnwath, Scotland

Death:  1410
Carnwath, Lanarkshire, Scotland

Castle_Campbell_Darnley, Scotland

Castle Campbell, Darnley, Scotland

Clan Stewart or Clan Stuart is a Highland Scottish clan. The clan is recognised by Court of the Lord Lyon, however it does not have a clan chief recognised by the Lord Lyon. Because the clan has no chief it can be considered an armigerous clan. There are several other ‘Stewart’ clans recognised by the Court of the Lord Lyon, these are: Clan Stuart of Bute and Clan Stewart of Appin. Clan Stuart of Bute is the only ‘Stewart’ clan at present which has a recognised chief. 

Origins of the clan

The Stewart family records its traditional descent from Banquo, Thane of Lochaber, who makes an appearance as a character in William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. Historically, however, the family appears to be descended from an ancient family who were seneschals of Dol in Brittany.The earliest recorded being Flaald.

They acquired lands in England after the Norman conquest, and moved to Scotland when David I ascended to the throne of Scotland. The family was granted extensive estates in Renfrewshire and in East Lothian and the office of High Steward of Scotland was made hereditary in the family.

Walter, the son of Alan or Fitz-alan was the founder of the royal family of Stewarts. He was the first of the family to establish himself in Scotland. Walter’s elder brother called William was the progenitor of the family of Fitzalan who were the Earls of Arundel. Their father who was a Norman married soon after the Norman Conquest. He married the daughter of Warine, sheriff of Shropshire. He acquired the manor of Ostvestrie or Oswestry on the Welsh border. On the death of King Henry I of England in 1135 Walter and William supported the claims of Empress Maud and in doing so raised themselves high in the favour of her uncle King David I of Scotland.

In 1141 Walter accompanied King David I to retire in Scotland on promises made to him by the Scottish monarch which were faithfully fulfilled. His brother William however remained in England and was rewarded by Empress Maud’s son, King Henry II of England.

In Scotland Walter obtained from King David I of Scotland large grants of land and property in Renfrewshire as well as in many other places, together with the hereditary office of Senescallus Scotiae, Lord High Steward of Scotland. From this title Walter’s grandson, also called Walter, took the name Stewart, which was forever afterwards retained by the family. This Walter was also rewarded lands by King Malcolm IV of Scotland. Walter is celebrated as the founder of Paisley Monastery in 1163 in the barony of Renfrew. Walter married Eschina de Londonia, Lady of Moll, in Roxburghshire. Walter died in 1177, he was succeeded by his son Alan Stewart.

Alan died in 1204 leaving a son called Walter who was appointed by King Alexander II of Scotland as justiciary of Scotland in addition to the hereditary office of high steward. This Walter died in 1246 leaving four sons and three daughters. The third son called Walter was Earl of Menteith. The eldest son, called Alexander married Jean, the daughter and heiress of James Lord of Bute. In her right their son James Stewart seized both the Isle of Bute and Isle of Arran. Clan Stewart

 

My Maternal 28th. Great Grandfather, Flaald, Seneschal de Dol, Bretagne, France

themorvanriver2cburgundy2cfrance

The Morvan River, Burgundy, France

Name: Flaald, Seneschal de Dol
Birth: circa 1005
Dol, Ille-et Vilaine, Bretagne, France
Death: circa 1064 (51-67)
Saint-Malo-en-Donziois, Nievre, Burgundy, France

Immediate Family:
Son of Aimon I, viscount of Dinan and Hildeburge de Bellême
Husband of Constance de Dol, possible daughter of Crinan & Bethoc of Atholl, Princess of Scotland and Constance, de Dol

Father of Alain “Dapifer” fitz Flaald, Seneschal of Dol
Brother of Robert Fitz Hamon; Geoffroi I, vicomte de Dinan; Hamon de Dinan; Seigneur Joscelin de Dinan, of Dinan; Ruellan I, seigneur de Dol and 7 others

Half brother of Aubert II Le Riche; Robert Brochard de Château-du-Loire, I; Gervais de Bellême, archevèque de Reims; Avesgaud de Château-du-Loire; Guillaume de Château-du-Loire and 1 other
Added by: Gretchen Renee Johnson on December 30, 2011
Managed by: Jessica Morgan and 30 others
Curated by: Pam Wilson, Curator  
Source: geni.com

lacelle-sur-nievre2cfrance

La Celle-sur-nievre, France